[Tips & Tricks] | Prisming

Had a few of you ask how this worked after my shoot with Allie, so I thought it'd be easier to answer all at once -- I can give you some links to some killer examples here too.

It's quite simple really -- 

1.  Grab a prism (possibly from here or any science shop site).

2. Lay it flush with your lens like so: 

3.  And twist or rotate it so it'll catch whatever is to the left or right of your subject.  I like to stand 45 degrees off from a window and throw it into the subject.  

Yes my subject is my adorable cat.

It can be subtle...

Or not as such...

4.  Try a different shaped prism.  I haven't tried it yet -- mine is a 6-inch triangular prism.  Of course different prisms will garner different effects.  Try 'em, go nuts -- and then let me know; I'm curious.

I first wanted to try it when high fashion photographer, Guy Aroch, did a shoot with gymnast, Nastia Liukin.  

If you look up his work, you'll see him use it a lot.  His style is my favorite so far that I've come upon.

After some digging, I found out that he used a prism, which led me to needing to know how he used it, what shape/kind, etc.

[Click the photos to go to the full site]

Nastia Liukin by Guy Aroch

You can use it subtly, or take it all the way to Sam Hurd-style.  

He was who I found next -- I'm not a huge fan of all the huge bright colors, but this is within the realm of possibility.  

Plus, he was the one who actually explained the process on his blog and even has a video that shows the real-time effects.   

(Some call it "Hurding" -- it's an old technique, so that's a bit misguided.)   

Sam Hurd

And just as an added bonus, French fashion photographer Patrick Demarchelier used one in a shoot for DKNY.   
Go ahead, click on the photo and be inspired.  Then go do!

DKNY shoot by Patrick Demarchelier